Wages

In Case You Missed It: Third and State Blog for Week of March 14

This week on Third and State, we blogged about the state budget, privatization, fruit salad (really?), and much more!

In case you missed it:

  • On the state budget, Sharon Ward shared resources from the Pennsylvania Budget Summit this week and wrote about priorities in the budget. Chris Lilienthal, meanwhile, highlighted a United Way of Pennsylvania survey documenting just how much budget cuts and the recession have taken a toll on vulnerable Pennsylvanians and the organizations that help them.
  • On privatization, Michael Wood took a closer look at the real costs of privatization, with highlights from a Budget Summit session on the topic.
  • In debunking claims about public- versus private-sector wages in Governor Corbett's budget speech, Mark Price suggested that the Governor's speech writers are fond of fruit salad — or at least apple-to-pears comparisons.
  • Finally, Mark has this week's "Dark Humor" Friday Funny: an article from The Onion explaining why March Madness has office employees in Columbus, Ohio thinking about how many of their co-workers were laid off in the wake of the recession.

More blog posts next week. Keep us bookmarked and join the conversation!

Fruit Salad, Anyone?

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The Governor's speechwriter appears to love apples to pears comparisons, or maybe bananas to oranges.  But nothing so plain as apples to apples.

I'm referring to the following quote from Governor Corbett’s budget address last week:

In Case You Missed It: Third and State Blog for Week of March 7

This week on Third and State, we blogged about Governor Corbett's state budget proposal, ways to grow the economy and promote broadly shared prosperity, "Mad Men" who like fast trains, and much more!

In case you missed it:

  • On the state budget, Sharon Ward explained why Governor Corbett's proposed 2011-12 budget should worry parents and property taxpayers, and Chris Lilienthal shared some budget resources and information from the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center.
  • On wages and the economy, Mark Price challenged the notion that education alone is the cure-all for the economy's woes and instead invokes the employee-focused business model used by The Container Store as an example of how to boost economic growth and broadly shared prosperity. Mark also delved deeper into the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's business climate rankings in a post titled "You Will Never Be Poor Enough."
  • On other economic issues, Mark shared a 60 Minutes segment on homeless children, while Steve Herzenberg passed on a powerful story that conveys one of the most critical roles that unions play.
  • Finally, we continue a new weekly series we're calling "The Friday Funny." This week, "Mad Men" who like fast trains (with a hat tip to PennPIRG's Megan DeSmedt for passing along).

More blog posts next week. Keep us bookmarked and join the conversation!

Can Businesses Make More Money by Paying their Workers More?

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We spend a lot time around here worrying about rising profits and stagnant wages, but that doesn't mean we don't want businesses to earn profits. Broadly shared prosperity means growth in productivity, which translates into growth in wages and profits. In short, it means we all prosper together.

The CBS Sunday Morning program ran a great story on The Container Store's employee-focused culture which you can watch below.

You Will Never Be Poor Enough

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Last week, I wrote about a U.S. Chamber of Commerce report that ranked the business climate in Pennsylvania as poor.

One of the states the Chamber ranks as having a good business climate is the low-wage and high-poverty state of Florida.

Wages and regulations, it seems, are even too high in Florida.

In Case You Missed It: Third and State Blog This Week

This week on Third and State, we blogged about the upcoming state budget, the end of adultBasic, a questionable business climate ranking, and much more!

In case you missed it:

  • On the state budget and the economy, Sharon Ward shared a podcast featuring her and Jan Jarrett of PennFuture discussing the state budget principles that will create jobs and ensure the long-term economic success of the Commonwealth. Mike Wood, meanwhile, challenged comments made this week by Budget Secretary Charles Zogby that Pennsylvania's budget woes are due to overspending. Mike points out that nearly every state in the nation — low-spending and high-spending alike — is facing a budget shortfall this year thanks to a recession-driven decline in revenue collections.
  • On the economy, Mark Price blogged about the problems with a new business climate ranking from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce that seems to favor states with lower wages and less human development. Mark also shared a funny but informative video of the Daily Show’s Jon Stewart discussing pay on Wall Street and for teachers. 
  • On health care, Chris Lilienthal highlighted a New York Times story on the end of Pennsylvania's adultBasic health insurance program this week and what that means for the more than 41,000 Pennsylvanians who lost their coverage.
  • Finally, on jobs and wages, Stephen Herzenberg noted that The Economist agrees with the Keystone Research Center on one thing: people don’t take government jobs to get rich.

More blog posts next week. Keep us bookmarked and join the conversation!

For Richer and Poorer - Teachers and Wall Street

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I highly recommend this funny but informative video of the Daily Show’s Jon Stewart discussing pay on Wall Street and for teachers.  

The Economist Agrees: People Don’t Join the Government to Get Rich

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One point we make to drive home the facts about public-sector pay is that people don’t say, “I’m leaving the private sector to go make more money.”

The Economist's Democracy in America Blog made the same observation in a recent post, Don’t join the government to get rich.

In Case You Missed It: Third and State Blog This Week

This week on Third and State, we blogged about the looming loss of health coverage for nearly 42,000 adultBasic consumers, a misinformation campaign on public- and private-sector pay, the problem with Arkansas' gas drilling tax, and much more!

In case you missed it:

  • On health care, Chris Lilienthal blogged about the faith community's call on Governor Corbett to preserve adultBasic health coverage for nearly 42,000 Pennsylvanians. Later in the week, Chris also wrote about a candlelight vigil planned for 5:30 p.m. February 28 outside the Governor's Mansion to protest the end of adultBasic.
  • On public sector wages, Mark Price urged readers, in light of the battle over collective bargaining rights in Wisconsin, to beware of misinformation campaigns on the differences in public- and private-sector pay.
  • On the natural gas drilling tax, Michael Wood explains why a prominent Arkansas Republican, two-time gubernatorial candidate, and former gas company executive wants to increase his state's natural gas drilling tax.
  • Finally, on jobs and the economy, Stephen Herzenberg cites New York Times economist David Leonhardt to explain why we need more action to create jobs.

More blog posts next week. Keep us bookmarked and join the conversation!

Beware of Misinformation Campaigns

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The battle over collective bargaining rights in Wisconsin has included claims that public servants in that state are overpaid.  However, employing techniques that economists have used for decades, Jeffrey Keefe finds in an Economic Policy Institute paper that:

On an annual basis, full‐time state and local workers and school employees are undercompensated by 8.2% in Wisconsin, in comparison to otherwise similar private‐sector workers.

And what about here in Pennsylvania?

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