Social Security

Morning Must Reads:The Pain Caucus in Europe and Pennsylvania

Paul Krugman leads off this morning with a review of the havoc created in Europe and here at home by what he calls the Pain Caucus.

Third and State This Week: Rising Unemployment, a Health Insurance Rate Hike and Momentum for a Drilling Tax

This week we blogged about momentum building for a natural gas drilling tax and rising unemployment in Pennsylvania. We also featured a guest post on the need for stronger insurance rate protections in Pennsylvania. And Mark Price kept us up to date with the Morning Must Reads.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

  • On jobs and unemployment, Stephen Herzenberg shared his media statement on the rising jobless rate in Pennsylvania.
  • On the Marcellus Shale, Sharon Ward highlighted a recent New York Times article on the problems that have come with Marcellus Shale growth in Pennsylvania. Kate Atkins urged readers to sign a letter to lawmakers in support of a drilling tax that would generate revenue to improve schools, fix roads, train workers, and protect the environment.
  • On health care, Athena Ford of the Pennsylvania Health Access Network penned a guest post on the need for better insurance rate protections in Pennsylvania.
  • Finally, Mark Price had Morning Must Reads on the economic polarization of the 99%, the need for more accountability in charter schools, how we can boost the economy, and what budget cuts and layoffs have in common.

More blog posts next week. Keep us bookmarked and join the conversation!

Morning Must Reads: Yes Bridges Need Repair & Little Old Ladies Are Homeless But Ask Yourself Have We Really Done Enough for the Top 1%?

With unemployment in the construction industry at record highs, interest rates low and a deep backlog of thousands of structurally deficient bridges in need of repair, now is a great time to spend money to fix stuff do nothing!

Actually, it is not really that bad; it's worse. The Pennsylvania Legislature is spending time debating changes to the state's prevailing wage statute, even though a large body of empirical research demonstrates that changes to prevailing wage laws do not lower construction costs.  Anyway, if you find yourself in Pittsburgh, make sure your car seat also doubles as a floatation device.

Third and State This Week: Jobs and the Marcellus Shale, Personal Incomes and the Myth of Tax Flight

This week, we blogged about the myth of tax flight, Marcellus Shale drilling and the state economy, and the increasing share of Americans drawing income from public programs like Social Security and unemployment compensation.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

  • On the federal budget and the economy, Emma Lowenberg wrote that more Americans are drawing income from government programs like Social Security and unemployment benefits. While some of this change can be attributed to naturally aging populations, much is undoubtedly the result of higher unemployment rates.
  • On the state budget, Chris Lilienthal highlighted a new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities busting the common myth that if you increase state taxes (or don't cut them), people will up and leave for lower tax states.
  • Finally, on the Marcellus Shale, Mark Price blogged that while oil and gas extraction is helping to reduce unemployment in Pennsylvania, it remains an open question precisely how big the impact is, given how small employment in that sector is relative to an economy that employs 5.8 million people.

More blog posts next week. Keep us bookmarked and join the conversation!

More Americans Drawing Income from Unemployment, Social Security

Emma Lowenberg, InternBy Emma Lowenberg, Intern

The fact that the economy is still struggling is not news to anyone. The national unemployment rate has increased steadily since February. Now, at 9.2%, it is not too far from its peak of 9.9% in December 2009.

Nationally, the personal income of 20% of Americans comes from the government through programs like Social Security and unemployment benefits, according to a report in The New York Times. The percentage is even higher in the economically worst-off states – like Florida, Michigan, Ohio, and Arizona.

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