Economy

Out with Austerity Economics, In With a ‘Moral Economy’

We released our annual State of Working Pennsylvania at the Keystone Research Center today.

Bottom line: the report shows that the economy is limping along and our job market is broken. State and federal policies driven by austerity economics are increasing joblessness, sparking greater economic inequality and undercutting American values.

With working families still struggling in this weak economy, we make the case for an alternative approach that focuses directly on job creation and building a stronger economy. We’re calling this new direction a “moral economy”— one that is more competitive economically and supports rather than undercuts American values.

Painting a Fuller Picture of Gas Drilling in PA Economy

The folks at the Penn State Marcellus Shale Education & Training Center, a collaboration of the university’s College of Technology and Agriculture Cooperative Extension service, took a look at the Marcellus Shale’s impact on Pennsylvania employment and income in 2009.

So what did they find? The Marcellus Shale is creating jobs, development and increased income, but at a much more modest level than predicted by industry studies. 

Third and State This Week: July Jobs, Public Sector Wages, an Insurance Marketplace and Why People Move

This week, we blogged about the future of purchasing health care insurance, the state of employment in Pennsylvania, the wages of public versus private sector workers and more!

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

  • On public sector wages, Stephen Herzenberg highlighted the recent, albeit not surprising, findings of an Economic Policy Institute study documenting that jobs in Pennsylvania state and local government are not the way to get rich.
  • On unions, taxes and migration, Michael Wood debunked claims that the outmigration of Pennsylvania taxpayers can be linked to unions. Most of the departures between 2004 and 2009, Mike writes, were to states with warmer climates.
  • On health insurance, Christopher Lilienthal blogged about the creation of a competitive health-insurance marketplace in Pennsylvania and how that will make purchasing high-quality and affordable health care easier and more efficient.
  • On jobs and the economy, Sean Brandon sorts through the recent labor market data and explains why we shouldn't put too much stock in a single month's jobs numbers, good or bad.

More blog posts next week. Keep us bookmarked and join the conversation!

About Those PA Job Numbers

Sean Brandon, InternBy Sean Brandon, intern

Last week (while Third and State was on holiday), Pennsylvania’s July jobs report came out. The unemployment rate for July jumped from 7.6% to 7.8%, with 493,681 Pennsylvanians out of work.

Third and State This Week: The Standard and Poor's Downgrade, Public Job Losses, and Energy Investment Bankers and the Marcellus Shale

Programming Note: Third and State will be taking the week of August 15 off. See you back here on August 22.

This week at Third and State, we blogged about the Standard and Poor's downgrade, doubts raised by energy investment bankers about a Marcellus Shale economic impact study, public employment job losses and more.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

  • On the economy, Mark Price blogged about the Standard and Poor's downgrade and the other "decidedly grim" economic news of the past couple weeks.
  • On the Marcellus Shale, Michael Wood wrote about doubts being cast by energy investment bankers on the findings in the Marcellus Shale Coalition's recent economic impact study. And, reacting to a recent Bloomberg News story, Mark Price reminded us that 72,000 new hires in the Marcellus industries is not the same as new jobs created.
  • Finally, Chris Lilienthal shared a graphic from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities highlighting the loss of 611,000 jobs in state and local governments during and after the Great Recession.

See you on August 22, 2011. Keep us bookmarked and join the conversation!

Public Employment Job Losses a Drag on Economy

Add this to the list of reasons that the economic recovery is limping along. Our friends at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities explain:

July’s employment report included more bad news from states and localities:  job losses are continuing. Since August 2008, state and local governments have slashed 611,000 positions, and the cuts have been getting worse — 340,000 of those jobs were lost in the last 12 months. July was the ninth consecutive month, and the 29th out of the last 35, in which total state and local employment shrank.

  Three Years of State and Local Job Losses  

The Standard and Poor's Downgrade

The economic news of the past two weeks has been decidedly grim.

On July 29, new data confirmed that the economy in the first half of 2011 grew much more slowly than necessary to bring down the unemployment rate.

A few days later, the bizarre debt-ceiling fight was resolved with agreement to cut nominal federal spending over the next two years. Economic forecasts prior to this deal put the U.S. unemployment rate at 8% at the end of 2012. Cuts to federal spending mean higher unemployment forecasts are on the way.

By the way, this morning the forecasters at Goldman Sachs increased their unemployment forecast for the end of 2012 to 9.25% — and that assumes Congress will agree to extend the current payroll tax credit before January.

Unless you are living off the grid, you couldn’t have escaped news that last week was brutal for the Stock Market. Then late in the day Friday, credit rating agency Standard and Poor's — after correcting a $2 trillion math error — decided to go ahead and downgrade the full faith and credit of the U.S. taxpayer from AAA to AA+.

So what should we do? To restore confidence in the United States' ability to pay its bills, Congress should take steps now to build a stronger economy, not weaken it as we did with the debt limit deal.

The chief problem in the world economy is both the U.S. and Europe have taken steps to slow rather than boost economic growth. This will have a major impact on the U.S.'s ability to pay down long-term debt.

Unless Congress takes immediate action to create jobs, we face the rising risk that the economy will continue to grow more slowly.

Is that decidedly grim enough for you?

Third and State This Week: Jobs and the Marcellus Shale, Personal Incomes and the Myth of Tax Flight

This week, we blogged about the myth of tax flight, Marcellus Shale drilling and the state economy, and the increasing share of Americans drawing income from public programs like Social Security and unemployment compensation.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

  • On the federal budget and the economy, Emma Lowenberg wrote that more Americans are drawing income from government programs like Social Security and unemployment benefits. While some of this change can be attributed to naturally aging populations, much is undoubtedly the result of higher unemployment rates.
  • On the state budget, Chris Lilienthal highlighted a new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities busting the common myth that if you increase state taxes (or don't cut them), people will up and leave for lower tax states.
  • Finally, on the Marcellus Shale, Mark Price blogged that while oil and gas extraction is helping to reduce unemployment in Pennsylvania, it remains an open question precisely how big the impact is, given how small employment in that sector is relative to an economy that employs 5.8 million people.

More blog posts next week. Keep us bookmarked and join the conversation!

Marcellus Shale, Unemployment and Industrial Diversity

Capitolwire has a recent story (paywall) about the impact of the Marcellus Shale on Pennsylvania's unemployment rate. There is no question that oil and gas extraction is creating jobs in Pennsylvania and thus helping reduce unemployment. But it remains an open question precisely how big the impact is given how small employment in that sector is relative to an economy that employs 5.8 million people.

More Americans Drawing Income from Unemployment, Social Security

Emma Lowenberg, InternBy Emma Lowenberg, Intern

The fact that the economy is still struggling is not news to anyone. The national unemployment rate has increased steadily since February. Now, at 9.2%, it is not too far from its peak of 9.9% in December 2009.

Nationally, the personal income of 20% of Americans comes from the government through programs like Social Security and unemployment benefits, according to a report in The New York Times. The percentage is even higher in the economically worst-off states – like Florida, Michigan, Ohio, and Arizona.

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