Third and State This Week: The Costs of Child Poverty, Too-Good-to-Be-True Liquor Privatization and Temp Workers

This week, we blogged about the economic costs of child poverty, a privatization study that is too good to be true, what the trends in temporary worker services suggest for Pennsylvania's economy, and much more.

IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

  • On poverty, Chris Lilienthal blogged about an analysis estimating that child poverty costs the United States' economy $500 billion every year in foregone earnings, healthcare expenses, and crime involvement. 
  • On privatization, Stephen Herzenberg highlighted testimony presented by researchers with the Keystone Research Center this week making the point that privatization of Pennsylvania's wine and spirits stores would not benefit state revenues but could increase alcohol-related social problems. 
  • On jobs and unemployment, Sean Brandon explained what the employment trends of temporary workers could mean for Pennsylvania as an indicator of broader job market trends. 
  • And in the Morning Must Reads this week, Mark Price wrote about news report on $7.7 trillion in loans and guarantees the Federal Reserve provided to troubled banks, the growing number of elementary school students who qualify for subsidized school lunches, and the real root of high unemployment among today's youth
More blog posts next week. Keep us bookmarked and join the conversation!

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